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Thanksgiving Safety Tips for Dogs and Cats

Orange, yellow and red leaves line the streets and the Halloween costumes are put away for another year. You know what that means! It’s only a few short weeks until Thanksgiving!

And while you check your guest list and count your serving utensils, don’t forget about your pets.

Thanksgiving is a wonderful tradition of food and family, but for your four-legged family members, it can present hazards. While Great Aunt Mabel preps her famous sweet potato casserole, Max and Fluffy can get into the trash behind her back and get dangerously sick.

Think of the traditional Thanksgiving foods, there’s fatty turkey trimmings – hello upset tummy! There’s cranberry sauce (loaded with sugar), dressing with onions, and other foods that can turn your Thanksgiving into an evening at the emergency vet.

Top Thanksgiving Hazards for Pets

1-      Fatty foods – Turkey skin is fatty. If you or a well-meaning guest give your dog turkey skin, your dog could develop a painful condition known as pancreatitis. It doesn’t take much either. Some dogs have sickened and even died from ingesting a small amount.

Other foods that are dangerous are onions, raisins, grapes and chocolate. So, don’t feed your pets dressing or chocolate pie either.

If you have guests who may be inclined to “share” with your four legged friends, please encourage them otherwise. Instead, allow your pet to join in the fun with some healthy pet treats like Wellness Kittles with Turkey & Cranberries for cats or Wellness CORE Marrow Roasts Savory Turkey Recipe for dogs.

2-      Trash – Whether it’s a tempting turkey carcass or a pile of “scraps,” the lure of the garbage may be too much for even the best-behaved pets to handle. It’s a good idea to exercise your “pet management” skills by either keeping your pets safely out of food prep areas or keeping the trash well out of reach – probably behind a cupboard door.

3-      Decorations – Lighted candles, crepe paper, and other decorations can prove hazardous to your pet’s health if they’re of the mind to chew on anything available or haven’t yet learned about fire. Keep an eye on them when they’re around and be alert for any unusual behavior.

4-      Be Aware of Poisoning Symptoms – Gastro intestinal upsets like vomiting or diarrhea are common symptoms of poisoning. This can occur when your pet has ingested things like chocolate, raisins, onions and other foods their bodies aren’t equipped to digest.

From toxicity to severe gastro-intestinal problems to blockages caused by splintered bones, the Thanksgiving table is rife with potential pet hazards.

If you suspect your pet ate something he or she shouldn’t have, call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Poison Control hotline immediately. 888-426-4435.

While food is a big part of pet hazards at Thanksgiving, crowds and traveling are two other considerations.

Crowds – Like people, some pets are fine with crowds while others would prefer the safety of a quiet place away from the noise. You know your pets the best. If they’re used to having the run of the house, you might choose to allow that but if they seem stressed or nervous around visiting toddlers, then you can escort them (your pets) to peace and quiet.

Road Tripping – If a road trip to Grandma’s is in your future, make sure your pets have secure kennels to ride in. Roaming pets can lead to distracted driving which can lead to traffic accidents.  Flying has its own rules of course and they vary by airline so you’ll want to check with them.

Now that you know these top Thanksgiving pet safety tips, exercise a little precaution when it comes to your pets and let your biggest concern be a perfectly cooked turkey.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Beat the Heat- How to Keep Your Pet Comfortable and Safe in the Summer Months

Summer is upon us, fellow pet lovers, and with summer comes lots of outdoor fun with our pets. However, depending on where you live, the summer heat can present many dangers to your pet. Pet owners can sometimes be oblivious to these dangers, which can result in many health risks for our furry friends. Keep your pet comfortable and safe this summer with these tips on how to beat the heat.

What Not to Do

With temperatures rising to potentially dangerous levels in the summer months, you have to be conscious of your pet’s safety. In the hot summer months, these are some of the ‘DONTS’ to keep in mind when caring for your pet in the heat.

  • Never leave your pet unattended inside of the car. Honestly, it is never a good idea to leave your pet unattended in a vehicle for any length of time beyond a couple of minutes, but this is especially true in the event of extreme temperatures, whether hot or cold. The inside of a car on just a warm day can reach dangerous and fatal temperature levels, and it can happen within minutes! Print out this Humane Society flyer to disperse and help to educate your community.
  • Do not put a muzzle on a dog while they are out in the heat. There is a reason why dogs start panting when they get really hot – it is a natural way of controlling their body temperature. When you put a muzzle on a dog while they are out in the heat, you are preventing this natural process from occurring, which can lead to over-heating or heat stroke.
  • Do not leave your pet outside for extended periods of time during extreme heat. If it is too hot for you to be outside for an extended period of time, then you should consider it too hot for your pet as well.

Warning Signs of a Heat Stroke
It is important to be aware of the signs that your pet may be in danger of a heat stroke. Some of these warning signs are –
  • Heavy panting
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Excessive thirst
  • Lethargy
  • Glazed eyes
  • Lack of coordination
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Dizziness
  • Profuse salivation
  • Vomiting

Pets who are most susceptible to suffering from heat stroke are usually very old or very young, overweight, or pets not conditioned to prolonged exercise. Speaking of exercise, if you are out exercising with your pet and they suddenly insist on slowing down or laying down – this is a sign that your pet is over-heated or over-exerted. Listen to what your pet is trying to tell you. Here are some more helpful tips on recognizing the warning signs of a heat stroke. If you suspect that your pet is suffering from a heat stroke, move them to the shade or an air-conditioned area immediately, place ice packs or cold towels to their head, neck and chest and take them to the veterinarian as soon as possible.

Tips to Consider
  • If your pet is going to be outside in the heat for any extended amount of time, be sure that they have access to plenty of water.
  • Do not assume that a dog house is a proper place for your pet to cool off in the heat. Dog houses are built to prevent air movement and can build up heat quickly.
  • When taking your pet out to exercise or walk/jog, be aware that the hot asphalt/concrete can be damaging to your pet’s paws. You’ve walked barefoot on hot asphalt before, right?
  • The best way to cool down your pet is by placing cool water or cloths on their neck, pads of feet, or belly.
  • If you have a longer haired dog, consider getting their hair cut shorter in the summer months.
Now that you know how to keep your pet comfortable and safe in the hot, summer months – get outside and have some fun with your pet on those beautiful, sunny days. Just don’t overdo it and stay cool – literally and figuratively.
With temperatures rising to potentially dangerous levels in the summer months, you have to be conscious of your pet’s safety. In the hot summer months, these are some of the ‘DONTS’ to keep in mind when caring for your pet in the heat.

Poison Prevention Awareness Month

Attention pet owners! March is Poison Prevention Awareness Month, which means that if you’ve never inspected your home or aren’t aware of the things that could be poisonous to your pet, now is the time to educate yourself! There are so many poisonous substances that can be harmful and even fatal to our pets, so it is important to know what’s in your home and also to be able to recognize the signs and symptoms that your pet may be in danger. So, in honor of Poison Prevention Awareness Month, we are offering up some tips!

photo cred: mybrownnewfies.com

photo cred: mybrownnewfies.com

Inspect!
Regular inspections are the best way to ensure that your home is free of elements that may be toxic to your pet. Let’s go room to room and talk about some things that could be harmful to your pet.

Kitchen

The kitchen is one of the most important rooms when it comes to poison prevention. People often make the mistake of assuming that certain table foods are safe for their pet, but this is a dangerous way of thinking. The following foods have been shown to be potentially harmful to pets –

  • Chocolate – especially dark chocolate, coffee, caffeine
  • Raisons and grapes
  • Yeast dough
  • Macadamia nuts
  • Raw or undercooked meat
  • Table salt
  • Garlic, onion and chives
  • Avocado

These are just some of the most common foods that can be hazardous to your pet. Consult with your veterinarian before sharing any table food with your pet.

Bathroom

The bathroom can be a dangerous place for your pet. Make sure you keep the following items in a place that is not accessible to your pet –

  • Human and pet medications
  • Cleaning supplies
  • Shampoo/conditioner
  • Bath salts and bathing liquids

Living Room

Household plants are a popular topic when it comes to poison prevention for our pets. If you are a pet owner and you like to keep plants in and around your home, be sure that you do your research before bringing a plant into your home that could be harmful to your pet.

Here are some other miscellaneous household items that can be toxic to your pet –

  • Batteries
  • Potpourri
  • Insecticides
  • Rodenticides
  • Plant fertilizer/plant food
  • Antifreeze
  • Yarn, rubber bands, dental floss

Secure!

Make sure that potentially toxic items are out of your pet’s reach. Pets can be pretty creative about finding a way to get into things, am I right?

  • Keep human medications and pet medications in separate areas, both secure and out of reach.
  • If you have multiple pets, make sure that their medications are kept separate, in order to keep them from getting mixed up.

Learn!

Do the necessary research to educate yourself on the topics surrounding poison prevention. What items are toxic to your pet? Talk to your veterinarian to find out if there are certain foods that may be more toxic to your pet than others. Read up on household plants and make sure that you don’t keep any toxic plants inside your home. Knowledge is power!

Read!

Pay attention to the labels on the items in your home. The label will often warn you if the substance is toxic to you or your pet.

  • Before administering any medication to your pet, make sure you read and understand the directions, and follow any doctor’s orders exactly.

Know!

Do you know what the common signs and symptoms of poisoning are? This is an important part of poison prevention. If you notice that your pet is displaying any of the following signs or symptoms, call your veterinarian immediately!

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Lethargy
  • Convulsions

If you can’t get in contact with your veterinarian, call the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center.

Prepare!

It is important to be prepared in the event that any emergency arises with your pet, and that includes possible poisoning. Keep emergency resources on hand and have the number of your local veterinary emergency hospital in an accessible place, so that you can seek help immediately.

Dog Park Etiquette: Playing by the Unwritten Rules

Dog parks – the social scene of the dog world. Taking your dog to a dog park is a great addition to their exercise routine and a great way for your dog to maintain healthy socialization skills. However, there is proper etiquette to be considered when visiting the dog park. If you want the other dogs to wag their tails in approval and the other dog parents to greet you with a smile, then there are certain rules that should be followed – here is a list of ‘Dos & Don’ts’ to follow at the dog park.


5 Dog Park Do(s)
Here are some tips that are guaranteed to help you and your dog both win the popularity vote at the dog park.

-Scoop the poop.

This one is first on the list because it is THAT important. If you aren’t cleaning up after your dog poops in the park then you are probably on someone else’s list – a blacklist. If you really want to earn some brownie points, pick up any other dog’s messes that have been left behind.

-Exercise first, dog park second.

Taking your dog to the dog park should not be their primary source of exercise – it should supplement an already existing exercise routine. In fact, the proper thing to do is to exercise your dog before taking him to the dog park, in order to release any pent up energy that could affect his behavior at the park.

-Supervise your dog while at the park.

Let’s be honest – we’ve all seen the dog owner at the park who sits on the bench and stares at their smartphone while their dog terrorizes all of the other dogs at the park. Don’t be this person.

-Leave the kids at home.

We know that your kids probably love their dog and a trip to the dog park probably sounds like a dream come true to them, but the dog park isn’t really a place for small children. There is a lot of heightened interaction going on between dogs at the park and not all dogs are crazy about kids.

-Be cautious about handing out treats.

If you are using treats for training purposes while at the park, be sure that there are no other dogs in close proximity to you. The best advice would be to skip the treats until after you have left the park to avoid any unnecessary confrontations and don’t ever give treats out to a dog other than your own. Does your dog like Wellness treats?

5 Dog Park Don’t(s)

It is important to always promote peaceful and pleasant interactions at the dog park so that everyone can enjoy their visit to the park. There are certain things that you just shouldn’t do while at the park with your dog.

DON’T bring a sick or unvaccinated dog to the park.

If your dog is sick, not up to date on vaccinations, or if you are unsure of your dog’s current health status, leave them at home until you know that your dog isn’t capable of spreading disease at the park.

DON’T allow your dog to bully other dogs.

If you notice that your dog is causing problems or is being the dog park bully, remove them from the park immediately.

DON’T bring your BLT to the dog park.

Never bring human food into the dog park – we shouldn’t have to explain the problems that this could create.

DON’T bring a dog to the park who doesn’t respond to verbal commands.

Does your dog come when they are called? Do they respond to your commands? These are basic training skills that your dog should have before turning them loose at the dog park. First things first.

DON’T keep your dog on a leash in a ‘no-leash’ dog park.

It doesn’t really make much sense to take your dog to the dog park if you plan to keep them on a leash the entire time. Plus, it can present safety issues for other dogs, especially if you are using a retractable leash.

Are you ready for your next trip to the dog park? Brush up on your dog body language signals so that you know how to recognize signs of trouble. A little dog park etiquette can go a long way to making the dog park a happy place for both pets and owners!

National Walk Your Pet Month

If you’re one of the 45% of Americans who make New Year’s Resolutions, chances are that weight loss and/or exercising more often is among them.

You probably already know about the health benefits of losing weight. There’s less stress on your joints, your heart, etc. But did you know that when your pet loses weight, he or she enjoys the same benefits?

According to Pet Obesity Prevention, 57.9% of American pets are overweight or obese. Even an extra two pounds on your cat (or five on dogs) is associated with greater risk for disease.

January is National Walk Your Pet Month which makes is perfect for the dogs in your life. Maybe for your cat too but most aren’t interested in walks.

And if the exercise benefits aren’t enough, dogs also enjoy mental stimulation by getting out in the neighborhood and sniffing the trees, sidewalks, fire hydrants and each other.

Walking Your Dog is Bonding Time

Walking together is a great time to focus on training your dog and strengthening the bond between you.

To get the most out of your time together, don’t walk and talk on the phone. Use this time to focus on your pet. They spend a lot of time alone already and need you. Praise them when they walk well and pay attention to you.

If your pet needs leash training, find a class, hire a dog trainer for a few sessions or watch YouTube videos on how to train your dog to walk on a leash. It’s no fun (and possibly dangerous) if your dog is doing the zoomies down the street at top speed about to pull your arm out of the socket.

If your dog already walks great on a leash, congratulations! Now you can focus on enjoying the walk and maximizing it for calorie burn:

Maximize Your Walk

You already know a slow meander isn’t going to do much for revving up the metabolism. However, if you’ve been more sedentary than active, you’ve got to start somewhere. Even a few minutes at a slow pace have more health benefits that sitting on the couch. As soon as you can though, speed up your walk, even if it’s only for a few seconds at a time.

An average is about one mile in a 20 minute period or 3 miles an hour. Are you walking that fast already?

Sometimes dogs can be tricky. They get caught up in the smells and slow your progress. This is another reason the leash training comes in handy. There’s a time to let them sniff and a time to walk. Maybe you start out slow or slow down when you get to a favorite spot. Over time, they’ll adapt to your rhythm if you train them to trot along beside you.

Of course, if you have a high energy dog, then your pet needs to run—daily—to burn off that excess energy. If you’re not a runner, then take your dog to the dog park or find a pet sitter who’ll run with your dog.

It’s hard to walk calmly on a leash when you’re filled with pent up energy.

Safety after Dark

It is January after all and it gets dark early. If your dog walking activities take place in the predawn or late afternoon/evening hours, you want to make sure you can be seen by motorists, bicyclists and other dog walkers/pedestrians.

A lighted leash and collar combination is good for the Fido in your life. You will do well to wear light colored clothes at least and better yet, a reflective vest or jacket.

What about you? How will you participate in National Dog Walking Month?

How to Keep Pets Safe at the Holidays and During the Cold Months Ahead

Dropping temperatures often means you and your pets may find yourselves indoors more than usual. The month of December can also present unique challenges for young or “new to you” pets in terms of schedule changes and holiday decorations.

With the first day of Winter approaching (Dec. 22) it’s also “Keep Pets Safe in Winter Day.” It’s a reminder to us of the hazards of the season.

You may think of the usual outdoor concerns such as making sure your pets steer clear of antifreeze and chemical de-icers – more on those in a minute – yet the indoor arena presents its own challenges.

Cords, Gift Wrapping and Tinsel – It Must Be the Holidays!

If you have older pets who have been with you through multiple holiday seasons, they may snooze through the gift wrapping and guests with barely a raised eyebrow.

On the other hand, if you have young pets, or even “new to you” pets, you’ll want to take precautions as you see how they behave.

Christmas Trees – Talk about excitement and confusion. You’re bringing a tree inside and hang it with shiny objects that swing about when batted. It smells good, it’s unusual and you’re giving it a lot of attention.

All of that makes it of interest to some pets. That interest may range from kittens batting ornaments off of it to jumping into the tree. Dogs may be delighted that you’ve brought them indoor plumbing.

Only they know what goes on in their minds.

Until you know your pet’s reactions, here are a few precautions.

  • Leave low branches empty — Don’t hang ornaments on low branches where they may tempt your furry friends to chew on them or knock them onto the floor. Delicate ornaments can break and cut your curious pets.
  • Don’t leave them unattended – Make sure your pets can’t access the tree easily when you’re not home. I’m sure you’ve heard of at least one story of a pet knocking over a Christmas tree. Or dogs who’ve chosen to forget their indoor manners – if you know what I mean.
  • Don’t use tinsel in your decorations. Animals who chew on tinsel can end up at the emergency vet. Why? Because the strands can twist around their internal organs and cause major damage. It’s not worth the risk.

Other Potential Indoor Hazards

  • Open flames from candles – keep them out of the way of wagging tails and curious kittens. It only takes a second for a disaster to occur.
  • Extension cords or electric throws/blankets – Chewing electric cords can electrocute your pet. Veterinarians say it’s quite common so please make sure your pet doesn’t have access to these.
  • Space heaters – Pets get too close and get burned. It’s also easy to knock over space heaters which can even start a fire. Use them with caution and only when you’re home.

Brrr…It’s Cold Outside

When the temperatures settle in the low ‘30’s or below, there are dangers of the elements for both humans and pets. Earlier I mentioned the dangers of antifreeze and chemical de-icers.

You may be familiar with these but in case you’re not, it’s important to realize the hazards.

  • Antifreeze is a magnet for pets. They like the taste of it and it’s poisonous. So make sure that the lids are on tight and out of reach of curious pets. It’s also important to clean up any antifreeze that may spill or leak from your car as it doesn’t take much of the stuff to trigger a reaction – especially in small animals.
  • Paw Pads take a beating. They’re exposed to the elements outside which means snow and ice crystals can lodge themselves deep in the nooks and crannies of your pet’s paws. So can chemical de-icers which you or your neighbors may use to keep your steps, driveway and sidewalk clear of ice.

The de-icers themselves are usually made of calcium chloride (a form of salt) which can burn your pet’s paws – and mouth when they lick their paws clean.

Your best protection is to use a combination of dog boots and to rinse off your dog’s legs and underbelly (if your pet has long fur) when you come in from outside. A towel, a brush and a pan of warm water (for legs/paws) will help keep your pet clean and free of harsh chemicals. It won’t, however, prevent your pet‘s paws from dryness.  For combating dry and flaky paw pads, a pet safe moisturizing balm is useful.

  • Dog Coats and sweaters benefit short haired dogs. Short haired dogs don’t have the extra fur of winter breeds to keep themselves warm so they’re at a disadvantage. Sweaters and dog coats come in all sizes. Even your Mastiff can stop shivering and stay warm in the winter with an extra layer.
  • Be Visible – The winter darkness puts you and your dog at risk when you’re walking. Use a reflective leash or winter clothes with reflective stripes to stay visible to cars, bikers and other pedestrians.

In extreme temperatures, frostbite and hypothermia can affect your pets. In such weather, your best bet is to protect paws with dog booties and keep walks short.

How will you protect your pets this winter?

The Benefits of Probiotics for Your Pet

Do you know how important your pet’s digestive health is to their overall well-being? A healthy gut prevents disease, improves digestion, aids in better nutrient absorption and boosts the immune system. So, in other words, digestive health is extremely important and that’s where probiotics come into play. What are probiotics? Probiotics are the good bacteria that live in our pets’ intestines and without the right balance of that good bacteria, your pet can experience major health issues. Let’s talk about the benefits of probiotics for your pet and how you can help to maintain that balance.

Benefits of Probiotics
So, what are the actual benefits of giving your pet food with a healthy amount of probiotics, or even adding probiotic supplements to their food?

Promote a Healthy Digestive System
Overall, a diet that is rich in probiotics will help your pet to achieve digestive balance and promote a healthy gut.

Slow and/or Eliminate Diarrhea
If your pet doesn’t already have a diet with added probiotics and they start to suffer from diarrhea, a probiotic supplement can help to treat the diarrhea. Once you start feeding your pet a probiotic-rich diet, such as Wellness TruFood, they will be less likely to suffer from digestive problems such as diarrhea.

Ease Gastrointestinal Ailments
Does your pet suffer from Irritable Bowel Syndrome or any condition similar to it? Probiotics can help to soothe most gastrointestinal ailments that your pet may be suffering from.

Do All Pets Need a Probiotic?
Because the digestive system is so closely connected to a pet’s immune system and overall health, all pets should have some form of a probiotic as part of their diet.

Probiotic Diet vs. Probiotic Supplement
While both forms of probiotics can be beneficial to your pet, feeding your pet a probiotic diet is the most proactive way to improve their health. Generally speaking, most pet foods that include a proper amount of probiotics are also among the healthier choices of pet foods. These foods will generally have more natural ingredients and are overall better choices for your pet.

Are you ready to start feeding your pet a diet that is rich in probiotics? Any chance to improve your pet’s overall health and potentially add years to their life is a chance that’s worth taking.

Wellness TruFood Thanksgiving Twitter Chat Recap

This year, we wanted to make sure that pet parents would be ready to include their furry family members in the Thanksgiving holiday feast. To do this, we recently hosted a Twitter Chat with Wellness veterinarian, Dr. Louise, DVM. During our 1-hour-long chat, we talked about ways to include healthy superfood ingredients in your pets meals with our Wellness TruFood line for dogs and cats. Take a look at how it went!

In preparation for the Thanksgiving season, as well as the Twitter Chat, we worked on a TruFood photoshoot to capture the delicious, nutrient-rich ingredients up close. We were joined by Wellness dog, Dakota, who was not shy with digging into her holiday plate and showing us all how tasty it was. Check out these behind-the-scenes “blooper” shots!

And now, the final product:

We’d like to thank everyone who participated in our Twitter Chat, and we’d like to congratulate winner @rooneyanddesi who won a year’s supply of Wellness TruFood for participating!

Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours.

The Purrfect Howl-O-Ween

Pumpkins, scarecrows and goblins, oh my! Halloween is upon us and this holiday is one that is fun for everyone – including our four-legged friends! Pet owners all across America look forward to this holiday and many spend hours upon hours picking out the perfect costume for their pets. How do you celebrate Halloween with your pet? We’ve got some tips on how to have a fun and safe Halloween with your pet!

The Costume Factor

If you have a pet that doesn’t mind suiting up in a festive Halloween costume, then you should consider yourself lucky! Not all pets will be jumping at the chance to wear a costume, so it’s important to make sure that you don’t force your pet to wear something that they aren’t comfortable in. Your pet can participate in the festivities simply by wearing a fun Halloween bandana. Be sure to consider safety issues when choosing a costume for your pet. Your pet should be completely comfortable in their costume.

Trick or Treating

Whether you are going out trick or treating or staying home to give out candy, keep your pet’s safety in mind!

  • If you bring your pet along for trick or treating, make sure they are on a leash the entire time.
  • If it’s dark outside, your pet should be wearing some type of reflective gear so that they are noticeable to all drivers.
  • Don’t let your pet leave home without their ID tag – you never know when they could get away from you.
  • While at home giving out candy, take extra precautions to make sure your pet doesn’t slip out of the door when trick or treaters arrive. If your pet is known to be an escape artists, it’s probably best to keep them in a secure area during this time.

Speaking of Treats…

What’s the first thing you think of when it comes to Halloween? Candy! Dentists everywhere cringe at the thought of what their patients are indulging in on this particular holiday. While candy isn’t really good for anyone, it can be even more harmful to our pets.

  • Keep all Halloween candy in a safe place where your pets cannot get to it. There are some candies that can be fatal to your pet, especially in large doses.
  • That doesn’t mean that your pet can’t have any treats on Halloween! Pick up some special Halloween treats for your pet so they don’t feel left out while everyone else indulges in their favorite candy.

Community Events
There are always some fun events going on in the community during Halloween, and some events are even catered specifically to our furry friends! These events are a great chance to get your pets out and allow them to socialize.
  • Pet Parades: We love a good pet parade! Whether your pet is dressed in full costume or simply sporting a spooky bandana, pet parades are a fun way for your furry friends to get some good exercise and socialize with other pets.
  • Costume Contests: What could possibly be better than a bunch of adorable dogs (and cats) dressed in funky Halloween costumes? If your community is hosting one of these events, you certainly don’t want to miss out! Your pet doesn’t have to be dressed up to get in on the fun! Again, if you take your pet out to any events in your community, keep their safety in mind. Make sure they are on a leash and they are wearing proper identification at all times.
Halloween can be such a fun holiday for the whole family, but it can also be a nightmare if you aren’t looking out for your pet’s safety. Take these tips into consideration and you and your pet are sure to have the “Purrfect Howl-o-Ween!

· Be sure to consider safety issues when choosing a costume for your pet. Your pet should be completely comfortable in their costume.

Tame Your Cat’s Hairballs

Hairballs aren’t welcome in any home – or in your cat’s stomach. Keep them under control with Wellness’ new Natural Hairball Control dry cat recipe.

Hacku To A Hairball
Wellness Cat presents
A farewell to gross hairballs
Sendoff performance

It’s hard to put any kind of positive spin on hairballs. It can be a common occurrence or a special occasion. But as parents to our beloved kitties, we all freeze in terror when hearing the approach of an impending hairball attack. This unmistakable hack roughly translates in human speak to: “Warning! Be prepared for a wet, hairy mess that will land in your general vicinity or that of a recently cleaned carpet. Evacuate the area in 5 seconds… 4 seconds… 3 seconds… oh, too late.”

Hairballs can be a result of your cat’s regular grooming routine, but they can cause problems with her digestive health (not to mention they go with nothing in your home’s décor!). Typically, the hair your cat swallows forms into what we call a hairball and is eventually vomited up. But, on top of the grossness that hairballs come standard with, she may not be able to get rid of it through the usual methods of expulsion. If it gets too large, it can cause problems within her digestive tract, resulting in bowel obstructions or constipation. In severe cases, she may even need to go into surgery in order to have a hairball obstruction removed.

Read more on PetGuide.com. Click the link here.