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7 Earth Day Tips For Your Pets

Earth Day is an annual holiday that encourages us to respect and care for the home we all share. This year, we challenge you to consider your four-legged friends when making your Earth Day resolutions.

7  Ways to Celebrate Earth Day Year Round with Your Pets

1—Recycled pet toys – From cat trees to stuffed animals, there are tons of pet toys made from bottles, paper and other materials salvaged from the landfill. One great option, the Kitty Scratch Pole, is made in the U.S.A. from recycled materials and can be used indefinitely by replacing the refillable, recycled cardboard discs that come with it.

2- Pet-friendly shampoo – There are dozens of pet shampoos on the market, but the eco-friendly option is to choose a pet shampoo made with natural ingredients which are safer for the environment and for your pet.

3-Use biodegradable bags—Grocery bags take hundreds of years to break down in the landfill. Using biodegradable waste bags is the more earth-friendly option. If you can compost the waste–that’s all the better.

4—Clean with vinegar – Max have an accident indoors? Grab the white vinegar to clean up. Vinegar and baking soda are time honored cleaning products. You’ll reduce your use of harmful chemicals and get the job done effectively.

5—Take your dog for hike—Most dogs love to get outside, enjoy some new sniffs and meet new friends. If hiking isn’t possible, go to a dog-friendly park and enjoy the Spring air.

6Clean out your closets – Donate old towels, blankets and bedding to a local animal shelter. The animals and volunteers will thank you.

7–Choose quality food – When your pet eats nutritious food, more of the nutrients are used within the body which results in less waste.

What are your favorite earth friendly ways to celebrate Earth Day? We’d love to hear your ideas on our Facebook Page.

Does Your Family Disaster Preparedness Plan Include Your Pets?

September is National Disaster Preparedness Month and it pays to be prepared. Planning for unforeseen circumstances can give you peace of mind—not to mention, keep your family safe.

When considering disaster preparedness for your family, it’s important to include plans for your pets. Here are some suggestions:

  • ID your pet. Tags get scratched or lost, and it’s easy to overlook replacing them as needed. Take a moment and review your pet’s tags. Do they need new ones? Dog with identification tag Have you moved and not replaced them with your current address? Is the information still legible? Refresh those tags either online or at the pet store. Proper ID makes it easier to be reunited if your pet gets loose. You may also want to consider microchipping your pet. A microchip implant is about the size of a grain of rice and is placed under your pet’s skin. According to the American Humane Association, “Microchipping serves as a permanent identification system that will always be with your pet. Nearly all animal shelters across the country routinely scan every animal upon intake for the presence of a microchip. Most veterinary clinics also have microchip scanners.”
  • Prepare food and dishes. Putting an extra set of dishes and some food and bottled water aside in case you have to evacuate quickly will help you in frenzied moments. If you pack kibble, make sure to rotate it out every few months so it doesn’t get stale and lose its nutritional value. If you pack canned food, make sure to include a manual can opener.
  • Speaking of evacuation, take your pet with you if you do leave. They are more likely to stay safe if they’re with you.
  • Think through where you could evacuate. Would you go stay with family? At a hotel? A shelter? Consider your options and make sure they’re pet friendly. Many shelters don’t take pets and though more motels and hotels do these days, it’s always a good idea to check it out ahead of time.
  • Make copies of your pet’s medical records. Put them in a waterproof bag or container along with a recent photo in case you’re separated.
  • Stash leashes, harnesses and carriers. These can all come in handy if you need to get your pet out of the house in a hurry. If you somehow get out of your house without them, having extras tucked away in your kit can be lifesaver. If you have cats, you may want to purchase cat harnesses to use in the case of an emergency where you cannot use your carrier.Cat on harness

The Humane Society recommends keeping a basic disaster preparedness kit in your car if you live in a hurricane or flood prone area and in your basement if tornadoes are prevalent where you live.

What about emergencies that prevent you from getting home to your pets? For example, there’s a bad ice storm and you can’t get there at your regular time? It’s a good idea to have a trusted friend, neighbor or family member you can contact during this type of situation. They’ll need a copy of your key and need to know where you keep the pet food, etc.

If you use a pet sitting service, ask them what their policies are for emergencies.

Spending a little time now on your family’s disaster preparedness plan can give you tons of relief later if you should ever need it.

What other suggestions do you have? We’d love to hear about them on our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/wellnesspetfood

Garden Dangers and Your Pets

It’s a gardener’s favorite time of year. The ground is thawing, the nurseries are coming to life and soon you’ll be digging holes for your bedding plants.

Of course, your favorite pets might like to join you in the hole digging too, or, they may simply find other means of entertainment that could be harmful.

Pesticides, cocoa mulch, even certain plants can be toxic to dogs and cats.   You already know your dog will likely eat anything— or at least to try it and see if it’s tasty…. and this can be a problem.

Beware of Toxic Plants

Plant bulbs such as Daffodils are toxic if your pet digs them up and eats them. So are Azaleas and Tiger, Day, Asiatic and Easter lilies- but with these plants, your pet only has to eat a few leaves or taste the flowers to be sick. Symptoms typically include vomiting or diarrhea and can sometimes even be fatal.

Pesticides and Your Pet

If you use pesticides on your grass or garden areas, you pet can ingest those chemicals. Even if your pet doesn’t eat the grass or plants but just noses around, dog’s noses are a mucous membrane that allows many substances to flow in.  Plus, pets lick their paws and if they’ve walked on treated grounds, that’s another way for them to ingest harmful chemicals.

Always read the label on a lawn treatment to learn what the possible dangers are to pets. If you have a lawn and garden company treat your lawn, be sure to learn what they’re using and their recommendations. They’ll usually tell you if it’s not safe for children and pets. There are organic pesticides that you can use instead.

Be cautious if you put traps in the yard or garden to attract slugs and other pests; often, dogs find them and eat them. They also may eat a dead rodent that was killed by poison.

Chocolate Mulch

It almost sounds like something straight out of Willy Wonka; “Tuck chocolate around your plants to keep them healthy.” Cocoa or chocolate mulch smells chocolaty and delicious yet it could be fatal to your pets. True to its name, chocolate mulch has theobromine in it, which is the ingredient in chocolate that is dangerous to dogs and cats.  If your pets eat it, it could cause diarrhea, vomiting, and even seizures.

Make sure your garden is pet safe and keep an eye on them if they’re spending a lot of time in the yard. If they show signs of sickness, get them to the vet to ensure their safety.

Fun in the Snow with your Dog (activities you can do with your dog outside)

Fun in the snowDoes your dog love playing in the snow? Many cold weather breeds like American Eskimos, Shiba Inus and Huskies are in their element when it snows- but this doesn’t mean that other breeds can’t have fun in the snow as well.

For many dogs, there is nothing better than waking up to a fresh coating of new snow, waiting to be explored. But why let your dog have all the fun? Here are some great ideas for games and activities that you and your dog can do together in the snow:

  • Chasing snowballs— Have a snowball fight! Most dogs love fetch and will delight in chasing either you or the snowball. Form snowballs from soft snow (don’t pack them hard and make sure there are no rocks or twigs), then gently toss them at the dog. Try tossing tighter packed snowballs in the air for the dog to jump at and try to catch. It’s quick, easy and a good workout for both of you!
  • Winter hiking or snowshoeing— If you love being outside in the snow, there’s no reason why your pup can’t come with you. Dogs love new spaces and smells, so take them along the next time you go for a hike or go snowshoeing. Just make sure you bring plenty of water for both of you as you’ll probably work up a sweat.
  • Shovel the driveway— It has to be done, so why not make a game out of it? Your dog might even want to run and chase after the flying snow. Remember, if your driveway is not fenced in, make sure to put your dog on a leash so that he doesn’t get overexcited and run down the street.
  • Create a maze in the snow— When you are finished with the driveway, shovel paths in the snow to create mazes and run through them with your dog. Your dog will love running through the paths!

Remember! Make sure your dog is adequately protected from the elements and stays warm. If you have a short haired or small dog it might be a good idea to buy him a coat or sweater to help him to stay warm while playing in the snow. Also, don’t stay out for too long if the temperature is bitter cold.

Do you have pictures of your dog in the snow? Why not share them on the Wellness Facebook page?

Tips for Keeping Your Pet Safe In The Winter

As we bundle ourselves up for these winter months it is important to remember our pets too! Some special precautions need to be taken to keep your pet safe from winter conditions. Here are 10 tips to keep your pet safe during this season:

* Watch the temperature. When the temperature outside falls below 20 degrees it is best to bring pets indoors. For short haired dogs, cats and young puppies or kittens it is best to bring them indoors when the temperature falls below 40 degrees.

* Make sure your pet’s outdoor water is not frozen. Remember, water freezes at 32 degrees and a frozen bowl of water will not do your pet much good.

* Check your car for nesting pets. The warm engines of parked cars attract pets seeking refuge from the cold. Before starting your car slap the hood to scare them away. Read the rest of this entry »

Pet food Ingredient Labels

Water is an extremely important nutrient with respect to a cat’s overall well-health.
Since cats do not have a strong thirst drive, it is important for a cat to ingest water with its food. Packed with the same whole food nutrition as our dry formulas, our canned foods are a delicious way to increase your cat’s moisture intake. As a special treat or as part of your regular feeding, our canned foods are yet another delicious way for your cat to eat healthy. Read the rest of this entry »